Bushwalking Appendices

Bushwalking appendix 1 – Walking trail classifications

Class 1:

Tracks provide opportunities for large number of visitors, including those with reduced mobility, to traverse the natural environment easily. They provide high level of interpretation and facilities. Steps allowed only with ramp access. Users need no previous experience and are expected to exercise normal care regarding their personal safety.

Class 2:

Tracks provide opportunities for large numbers of visitors to walk easily in natural environments. They provide moderate to high level interpretation and facilities. They are generally on low gradients. Users need no previous experience and are expected to exercise normal care regarding their personal safety.

Class 3:

Tracks provide opportunities for visitors to walk in slightly modified natural environments requiring a moderate level of fitness. They provide low level of interpretation and facilities. Users need no bush walking experience and a minimum level of specialised skills. Users may encounter natural hazards such as steps and slopes, unstable surfaces and minor water crossings. They are responsible for their own safety.

Class 4:

Tracks provide opportunities for visitors to explore and discover relatively undisturbed natural environments along defined and distinct tracks with minimal (if any) facilities. They provide minimal interpretation and facilities. Users can expect opportunities for solitude and few encounters with others. Users require a moderate level of specialised skills such as navigation skills. Users may require maps and navigation equipment to successfully complete the track. Users need to be self-reliant, particularly in regard to emergency first aid and possible weather hazards.

Class 5:

Tracks provide opportunities for visitors with outdoor skills to discover the natural environment. Visitors require a higher degree of specialised skills such as navigation skills. Users may require maps and navigation equipment to successfully complete the track. Users need to be self-reliant, particularly in regard to emergency first aid and possible weather hazards.

Class 6:

Users require previous experience in the outdoors and a high level of specialised skills such as navigational skills. Users will generally require a map and navigation equipment to complete the track. Users need to be self-reliant, particularly in regard to emergency first aid and possible weather hazards.

 

The above classifications come from the Australian Standards 2156.1-2001: Walking tracks – Classification and signage.

A detailed review of the Australian Standards 2156.1-2001: Walking tracks – Classification and signage can be downloaded from http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/file.aspx?id=36771

 

 

Bushwalking appendix 2 – Common bushwalking equipment

The equipment required and the appropriate “type” of equipment used is dependent on the specific context of the activity.

Equipment used for bushwalking may include but is not limited to:

Emergency/rescue

  • Documentation (see Part I – Core Standard – activity leader required documentation)
  • Emergency communication equipment (see Part I – Core Standard – emergency communication)
  • First aid kit in waterproof storage (see Part I – Core Standard – first aid equipment and medication)
  • A waterproof method of storing and carrying documentation and communications equipment
  • Specific activity context equipment required
  • Emergency shelter where appropriate for the context
  • Emergency equipment to keep a patient warm (g. mat, sleeping bag) where appropriate for the context
  • Signalling device(s) g. mirror, flares

Activity Leaders

  • communications equipment (standard communication rather than emergency communication where this differs) and spare batteries or backup “power banks”
  • relevant maps and navigation information
  • a waterproof method of storing and carrying maps and navigation information
  • compass and/or other navigation aids g. GPS
  • pen/pencil and blank writing paper
  • watch or equipment suitable to tell and measure time for first aid purposes
  • head torch and spare batteries
  • same as for participant

Participant

  • personal medications (including for asthma and anaphylaxis)
  • personal hygiene requirements
  • whistle
  • strong backpack, suitably sized and adjusted
  • waterproof pack liner
  • water containers
  • jumpers (woollen or non-cotton fleece)
  • thermals
  • beanie or balaclava
  • sun hat
  • raincoat suitable for the environment
  • overpants
  • footwear suitable for the conditions
  • suitable socks
  • shirt with collar and preferably long sleeves
  • strong shorts or trousers (synthetic fabrics preferable)
  • underwear
  • gloves
  • light garden gloves
  • handkerchief
  • pocket knife
  • sock covers or gaiters
  • sunglasses
  • spare prescription glasses
  • walking pole(s)
  • sit mat
  • high visibility vest
  • sunscreen

Group

  • trowel for toileting
  • toilet paper
  • hand sanitiser
  • water purification ‘system’
  • repair kit
  • food for duration plus spare
  • rubbish bags
  • multi-tool with knife
  • sunscreen
  • insect repellent

Refer Part I – Core Standard for first aid kit common content.

 

Additional equipment used for overnight or extended duration walks may include but is not limited to:

Emergency or rescue

  • Emergency fire lighting equipment appropriate to the activity and location

Activity Leaders

  • As per participant

Group

  • appropriate shelters e.g. tent
  • cooking equipment and ‘lifters’ for pots
  • cleaning equipment for catering equipment
  • cooking stove and fuel
  • matches/lighter
  • glow sticks, spare batteries, candles

Participant

  • small torch and spare batteries
  • sleeping bag in waterproof bag
  • eating utensils such as cutlery, bowl, plate and cup
  • spare clothing
  • spare shoes for camp
  • sleeping mattress

 

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